Fix-a-Leak

Fix-A-Leak

The Facts on Leaks

  • The average household's leaks can account for more than 10,000 gallons of water wasted every year, or the amount of water needed to wash 270 loads of laundry.
  • Ten percent of homes have leaks that waste 90 gallons or more per day.
  • Common types of leaks found in the home include worn toilet flappers, dripping faucets, and other leaking valves. All are easily correctable.
  • Fixing easily corrected household water leaks can save homeowners about 10 percent on their water bills.
  • Keep your home leak-free by repairing dripping faucets, toilet flappers, and showerheads. In most cases, fixture replacement parts don't require a major investment.
  • Most common leaks can be eliminated after retrofitting a household with new WaterSense labeled fixtures and other high-efficiency appliances

Get Free Leak Detector Tablets


City Building Address
City Hall Receptionist 222 N. Tennessee St.
Environmental Services 1550 S. College St., Bldg. D
Development Services 221 N. Tennessee St., 1st floor
Engineering 221 N. Tennessee St., 2nd floor
Annex B - Code Department 314 S. Chestnut St., Ste 103
Annex B - Housing and Community Development 314 S. Chestnut St., Ste. 101
Municipal Court 130 S. Chestnut St.
Hall Memorial library 101 E. Hunt St.
John & Judy Gay Library 6861 W. Eldorado Pkwy.
Senior Recreation Center 1400 S. College St.

How to Use Leak Detector Tablets

  1. Remove the lid to your toilet
  2. Place the blue pills found in the packet in tank part of your toilet.
  3. Wait about 15 minutes
  4. If the water in your toilet becomes blue, it means you have a leak

How to Fix a Leak


Learn how to fix a leak on the Environmental Protection Agency website.

Common Leaks


Toilets

  • If your toilet is leaking, the cause is often an old, faulty toilet flapper. Over time, this inexpensive rubber part decays, or minerals build up on it. It's usually best to replace the whole rubber flapper—a relatively easy, inexpensive do-it-yourself project that pays for itself in no time.
  • If you do need to replace the entire toilet, look for a WaterSense labeled model. If the average family replaces its older, inefficient toilets with new WaterSense labeled ones, it could save 13,000 gallons per year. Retrofitting the house could save the family nearly $2,400 in water and wastewater bills over the lifetime of the toilets.

Faucets

  • A leaky faucet that drips at the rate of one drip per second can waste more than 3,000 gallons per year. That's the amount of water needed to take more than 180 showers!
  • Leaky faucets can be fixed by checking faucet washers and gaskets for wear and replacing them if necessary. If you are replacing a faucet, look for the WaterSense label.

Showerheads

  • A showerhead leaking at 10 drips per minute wastes more than 500 gallons per year. That's the amount of water it takes to wash 60 loads of dishes in your dishwasher.
  • Most leaky showerheads can be fixed by ensuring a tight connection using pipe tape and a wrench. If you are replacing a showerhead, look for one that has earned the WaterSense label.

Outdoors

  • An irrigation system should be checked each spring before use to make sure it was not damaged by frost or freezing. An irrigation system that has a leak 1/32nd of an inch in diameter (about the thickness of a dime) can waste about 6,300 gallons of water per month.
  • To ensure that your in-ground irrigation system is not leaking water, consult with a WaterSense irrigation partner who has passed a certification program focused on water efficiency; look for a WaterSense irrigation partner.
  • Check your garden hose for leaks at its connection to the spigot. If it leaks while you run your hose, replace the nylon or rubber hose washer and ensure a tight connection to the spigot using pipe tape and a wrench.